Woodturning

Woodturning is the method of using a lathe to create wooden objects. It differs from most other methods of woodworking in that in woodturning, the wood moves while the tools used to cut and shape the wood are stationary.

Common examples of woodturning are bowls, platters, vases, furniture legs, pens and urns and a host of other interesting designs.

The origin of woodturning is believed to be in Egypt around 1300BC. The Egyptians used a rope with which one man turned the wood while another used a sharp tool to create the desired shapes. The use of the 2 man rope method evolved into a turning bow, the bow to a pedal operated lathe which freed the hands of the turner making it a one man operation and finally into the motorized lathes used today.

There are two major methods of woodturning, spindle turned and faceplate turned. Spindle turning involves locating the piece of wood between two points, the drive and the tailstock with the grain of the wood running paralell to the bed of the lathe. Examples of spindle turnings are spoons, pens, table and chair legs, stair balusters and newel posts.

Faceplate turning involves mounting the piece of wood either on a faceplate or between centers as in spindle turning but with the grain orientation running perpendicular to he bed of the lathe. Examples of faceplate turning would typically be bowls, platters and hollow vessels (although many hollow vessles are turned in a spindle orientation also).

If you or anyone you know is interested in more information about woodturning, I’d recommend visiting the AAW (American Association of Woodturners) and view their Community section which gives information on local woodturning clubs and chapters near you.

I’m a proud member of
American Association of Woodturners
American Association of Woodturners

and


Cape Cod Woodturners

and

Gateway Turners
Gateway Turners